7 Journal Prompts That Will Help You Get Through a Breakup

There is no easy way to get over a breakup.

We all have our methods of how to heal. We put together perfect breakup playlists, buy Ben & Jerry's, watch every romantic movie on Netflix and vent to our friends for hours. However, sometimes you can do all of those things and still feel sad and angry.

We all heal at our times and you can't rush your healing process, but running away from your emotions will only prolong your post-breakup sadness. It's easy to push away your feelings and distract yourself because it's not fun to work through your grief and process what happened.

Combing through your relationship and reliving memories is often the last thing we want to do after a breakup, but it's often the fastest way to heal. It allows you to work through all the hurt and confusion, so you don't hold on to the pain or bring it into your next relationship.

When you feel like you are ready to process your emotions, here are seven journal prompts to get you on the right track. Pour yourself some tea, put on Taylor Swift, get cozy, grab a journal and get ready to face those emotions so you can move on.

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What do you wish you could say to your ex right now?

It's common that you share your feelings when you are going through a breakup because you are so shocked, hurt or angry. When we look back, there are so many things we wished we had shared. It's impossible to move on when you feel like you have so much left unsaid. Use this prompt to vent all your unexpressed thoughts and feelings. Do you wish you could say you miss them? Or you're angry that they never listened to you? Whether it's good or bad, spill it out. If you connect with them again, you can have your thoughts organized for what you want to say, but even if you never talk to them again, it will help you close that chapter of your life and move on.

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What were the best parts of your relationship? What was the worst?

It is painful to look to the past when you're just bouncing back from your relationship. However, it's healthy to reflect on it. You can remember good memories and cherish them. You can reflect on painful times and learn from them. Whether it's good or bad, every memory is special and it's okay to reminisce for some time. It will also help you when you start dating again because you'll know what makes you happy and what hurts you in a relationship.

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Did you see it coming or was it a surprise? Looking back, do you see warning signs?

It's normal to ignore the little problems in a relationship, but only later realize all the red flags you were missing. Whether you had a feeling that this breakup was coming or it took you by surprise, there are usually previous warning signs that will become clear to you now. It's important to note those red flags so you can watch out for them in your next relationship.

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Why did you break up?

There could be one reason, there can be a million reasons, or you might not even know the reason! You don't need to pinpoint the exact cause. It's about working your way through the breaking point. It's easy to blame yourself for a breakup because you think you could have prevented it, but often when we reflect on the situation, you realize that there is nothing that you could have done to stop it. It also helps process the resentment, anger and pain you feel for the breakup once you vent all your emotions about that moment.

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What did you gain from this relationship or what did you gain from it ending?

You gain a deeper understanding of yourself when you're in a relationship. You learn about what you like and what you don't like in a partnership. Your partner helps bring out new sides to you, which helps you grow.  These are all helpful lessons that you can gain. Write down a list of everything you learned while you were in a relationship, and then list all the fantastic things you've gained from ending the relationship. Maybe you have gained more time to focus on yourself, freedom or a greater sense of peace and new opportunities.

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What are your goals for the next day? Week? Month? Year?

Breakups can feel like the end of the world. It can be hard to imagine how you're going to get past this pain and heartbreak. Setting and reaching new goals can help you move in a new direction. Start with small goals that you can achieve that day, which will help you feel like you accomplish tasks and motivate you to do more. It can be as simple as "reach out to a friend." Next, you move on to your goals for the month. Maybe you want to spend more time on your songwriting or other passion projects. These are just little road signs to help you stay focused on moving forward and away from the past. Finally, write your year goals. Do you want to make new friends? Do you wish to improve your grades?  You'll be surprised how fulfilled you'll be when you focus on all areas of your life.

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How can I love myself better?

This is not the time to blame yourself for the end of the relationship. We're human and we all make mistakes. More than ever, you need to focus on self-love. Write down a list of ways you can care, love, heal and protect yourself. It might not be easy to show yourself love when you're used to it coming from an external source, but it's so meaningful when it comes from yourself. Put yourself first and know that eventually, this painful time will pass, but you will always be there for you.

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Recovering from heartbreak is hard, but recovering from a breakup during social distancing when you can't see your friends for comfort is even worse. HERE are five tips on how to deal if you've been dumped amid social distancing.