This is the Moisturizer You Should Use, Based on Your Skin Type

When it comes to taking care of our skin, there are so many things to consider.

Not only do you have to choose from toners, serums, creams and moisturizers, but you need to make sure they're good for your skin. Since we all have different skin types, we have varying needs, meaning the products we use will also be different. Most people fall under one of the five major skin types: normal, dry, oily, combination and sensitive. We spoke with Dr. Hadley King, board certified dermatologist, about moisturizer in particular.

Keep scrolling to find out the type of moisturizer you should be using, based on your skin type:

Normal Skin

Sweety High: What type of moisturizer should people with normal skin use?

Dr. Hadley King: A moisturizer that's not too light and not too heavy. A lotion, cream or water-based gel may be effective (like GoodJane's H2OMYGOD water cream).


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SH: What ingredients should people with normal skin look for in a moisturizer?

DHK: Look for ingredients like hyaluronic acid and glycerin.

 

SH: What ingredients should people with normal skin avoid in a moisturizer?

DHK: Even in normal skin I would recommend avoiding comedogenic ingredients for any areas that may be susceptible to clogged pores.

 

Dry Skin

SH: What type of moisturizer should people with dry skin use?

DHK: Heavier moisturizers will be helpful for dry skin, meaning creams instead of lotions or gels, and products that have more emollients and occlusives.


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SH: What ingredients should people with dry skin look for in a moisturizer?

DHK: Look for emollients like cholesterol, squalene, fatty acid, fatty alcohols and ceramides, as well as occlusives like petrolatum, beeswax, mineral oil, silicones, lanolin and zinc oxide.

 

SH: What ingredients should people with dry skin avoid in a moisturizer?

DHK: Avoid added active ingredients like retinol or salicylic acid, as it may be difficult to tolerate.

 

Oily Skin

SH: What type of moisturizer should people with oily skin use?

DHK: Lighter, non-comedogenic moisturizers will be helpful, like lotions and water-based gels.


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SH: What ingredients should people with oily skin look for in a moisturizer?

DHK: Look for humectants like hyaluronic acid and glycerin, as well as emollients. Occlusives may not be necessary, particularly if the environment is not too dry.

 

SH: What ingredients should people with oily skin avoid in a moisturizer?

DHK: Avoid potentially comedogenic or pore-clogging ingredients like coconut oil and cocoa butter.

 

Combination Skin

SH: What type of moisturizer should people with combination skin use?

DHK: I'd recommend the same types of products as for normal skin (a lotion, cream or water-based gel), and use more in dry areas and less in oilier areas.


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SH: What ingredients should people with combination skin look for in a moisturizer?

DHK: A combination of humectants, emollients and occlusives.

 

SH: What ingredients should people with combination skin avoid in a moisturizer?

DHK: Because of the oily areas, I would recommend avoiding potentially comedogenic or pore-clogging ingredients, like coconut oil and cocoa butter.

 

Sensitive Skin

SH: What type of moisturizer should people with sensitive skin use?

DHK: I would recommend lotions and creams with a combination of humectants, emollients and occlusives.


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SH: What ingredients should people with sensitive skin look for in a moisturizer?

DHK: Look for a combination of humectants, emollients and occlusives.

 

SH: What ingredients should people with sensitive skin avoid in a moisturizer?

DHK: Avoid added active ingredients like lactic acid or retinol or salicylic acid. Also avoid essential oils, which are a common cause of allergic contact dermatitis.

 

Want to learn more about moisturizers? Look HERE to find out all you'll ever need to know about moisturizers.